Four legs good, two legs better

4.75-4.49 million years ago

There’s been a lot of hullabaloo in the last few days over claims that a jaw assigned to the 7.2 million year old Graecopithecus freygbergi represents the earliest known human relative after the hominin/chimp split. The jaw was found in Greece, which suggests that the split happened around the Mediterranean, rather than in Africa. (This doesn’t take anything way from the claim that Africa is the main center of later human evolution, up to 2 million years ago, which would have taken place when Graecopithecus’ descendants migrated to Africa).

All this needs to be taken fairly skeptically: a mandible with one tooth isn’t overwhelming evidence.

Here I cover some of what we know about the evolution of bipedalism. This is mostly in the context of Ardipithecus ramidus, but I have some suggestions at the end of the post about how the Graecopithecus find might be relevant.

ardipithecusWith Ardipithecus ramidus (4.5 million years ago) we have the strongest evidence so far that hominins have adopted bipedalism. Earlier fossils, including the earlier Ardipithecus kadabba, are too fragmentary to be very sure. Even “Ardi” was not bipedal quite the way we are. She had a somewhat diverging big toe, and arms and hands well-adapted for suspension, suggesting she was bipedal on the ground, but still spent a lot of time in trees.

We’ve seen bipedalism before on Logarithmic History. Bipedalism allowed ancestral dinosaurs to overcome the tight coupling of locomotion and respiration that prevents sprawling lizards from breathing while they run. But human bipedalism, with no counterbalancing tail, is different. As far as we know it evolved only once in the history of life (or maybe twice if Oreopithecus was bipedal).

In part human bipedalism is related to the general primate phenomenon of having grasping hands. Both humans and macaques, for example, devote separate areas of the brain (within the somato-sensory cortex, specifically) to each finger on each hand. Brain areas for the toes, by contrast, are more smooshed together.
monkeyhands

Human bipedalism is more specifically related to tradeoffs in locomotion in  great apes. Other great apes pay a big price for being the largest animals well-adapted for moving around under and among branches: great ape locomotion on the ground is particularly inefficient. Chimpanzees spend several times as much energy knuckle-walking on all fours as you would expect based on comparisons to similar sized quadrupedal mammals. Remarkably, chimpanzees don’t take any more energy walking on two legs than they do walking on all fours, even though they aren’t at all well-adapted to bipedalism. Humans by contrast take a little less energy to walk around than a same-size four-legged mammal, and way less than a chimp.

That said, efficiency isn’t everything. Human beings are lousy at sprinting – try outsprinting your dog, or a squirrel for that matter. Our top speed is less than half that of a chimpanzee.

So there’s a tradeoff between the efficiency advantages of bipedalism (at least compared to knuckle walking), and the loss of speed. It may be that bipedalism evolved initially in an environment where predation pressure wasn’t very intense, and the need for speed was not as great. This argument has been made for Oreopithecus, living on an island in the Mediterranean. Perhaps Graecopithecus initially enjoyed a similar isolation, and freedom from predation, associated in some way with the drying and flooding of the Mediterranean.

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One thought on “Four legs good, two legs better

  1. Pingback: Southern apes | Logarithmic History

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