Tag Archives: Cenozoic

A bear there was, a bear, a bear

50.2-47.5 Million years ago

The end-Cretaceous mass extinction knocked off not only the dinosaurs (except for birds), but also air-breathing marine predators like mososaurs and plesiosaurs. Birds and mammals started moving into the empty niche: penguins from early on, and eventually whales.
penguins

(Cartoon by Sam Gross. Not scientifically accurate.)

People around the world seem to be naturally inclined to distinguish major animal life forms according to whether they walk, fly, swim, slither, or creep, so evolutionary shifts in modes of travel – the origin of flight, the return to the sea – really catch people’s imagination – and provoke Creationists. The whale story is particularly dramatic. When Darwin was tried to account for the evolution of whales from a land-dwelling ancestor, he cited accounts of bears swimming and feeding in water, and wrote “I can see no difficulty in a race of bears being rendered, by natural selection, more and more aquatic in their structure and habits, with larger and larger mouths, till a creature was produced as monstrous as a whale.” This statement attracted so much ridicule that Darwin took it out of later editions of The Origin of Species. But he turns out to have been very much on target. We now have a great sequence of whale ancestors. The sequence runs from today’s Pakicetus — a wolf size meat-and-fish eater that splashed along the shores of the ancient Tethys sea separating Africa from Eurasia — to the “walking whale,” Ambulocetus, and on to true whales. Darwin was sort of on the right track thinking of bears, but anatomy and genetics put the ancestors of whales firmly among artiodactyls – hooved animals including hippos, pigs, and cows.

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Strange relations and island continents

56.2-53.2 Mya

We’re now in the Cenozoic era – our era. The transition from Paleocene to Eocene epochs in the early Cenozoic (55.9 million years ago) saw a spike in CO2 levels and a sharp rise in temperatures that lasted for several hundred thousand years – perhaps an analog for even more rapid human-caused global warming in our own time. (A recent review is here.)

We’ve seen a great many catastrophes in the history of life, and been reminded of the role of sheer chance in evolution. But the Cenozoic also sees a dramatic adaptive radiation and the steady progress of arms races among survivors of the great dinosaur die-off. Four large scale groupings of placental mammals have already appeared: Afrotheres (aardvarks, hyraxes, elephants, and sea cows), Xenarthrans (anteaters, armadillos, and sloths), Laurasiatheres (shrews, hedgehogs, pangolins, bats, whales, hoofed animals, and carnivores), and Supraprimates (aka Euarchontoglires, including rodents, tree shrews, and primates). This grouping of mammals is anything but obvious – it’s only with DNA sequencing that it has emerged. What’s noticeable is the association with different continents: Afrotheres with Africa, Xenarthrans with South America, and the others with the monster content of Laurasia (Eurasia and North America). Looking beyond placental mammals we see other continental associations: marsupials flourish in South America and Australia, and giant flightless “terror birds” carry on rather like predatory dinosaurs in South America.

There is a pattern here. Evolutionary arms races are most intense in the supercontinent of Laurasia (eventually joined by India and Africa). The island continents of South America and Australia stand apart, and they fare poorly when they start exchanging fauna with the rest of the world. We’ll see a similar pattern – large areas stimulate more competition, and more intense evolution, isolated areas are at a disadvantage – when we start looking at human history. (This is a major theme of Diamond’s deservedly popular Guns, Germs, and Steel.)

A bear there was, a bear, a bear

The end-Cretaceous mass extinction knocked off not only the dinosaurs (except for birds), but also air-breathing marine predators like mososaurs and plesiosaurs. Birds and mammals started moving into the empty niche: penguins from early on, and eventually whales.
penguins

(Cartoon by Sam Gross. Not scientifically accurate.)

People around the world seem to be naturally inclined to distinguish major animal life forms according to whether they walk, fly, swim, slither, or creep, so evolutionary shifts in modes of travel – the origin of flight, the return to the sea – really catch people’s imagination – and provoke Creationists. The whale story is particularly dramatic. When Darwin was tried to account for the evolution of whales from a land-dwelling ancestor, he cited accounts of bears swimming and feeding in water, and wrote “I can see no difficulty in a race of bears being rendered, by natural selection, more and more aquatic in their structure and habits, with larger and larger mouths, till a creature was produced as monstrous as a whale.” This statement attracted so much ridicule that Darwin took it out of later editions of The Origin of Species. But he turns out to have been very much on target. We now have a great sequence of whale ancestors. The sequence runs from today’s Pakicetus — a wolf size meat-and-fish eater that splashed along the shores of the ancient Tethys sea separating Africa from Eurasia — to the “walking whale,” Ambulocetus, and on to true whales. Darwin was sort of on the right track thinking of bears, but anatomy and genetics put the ancestors of whales firmly among artiodactyls – hooved animals including hippos, pigs, and cows.

Strange relations and island continents

We’ve now reached the Cenozoic era – our era. The transition from Paleocene to Eocene epochs in the early Cenozoic (55.9 million years ago) saw a spike in CO2 levels and a sharp rise in temperatures that lasted for several hundred thousand years – perhaps an analog for even more rapid human-caused global warming in our own time. (A recent review is here.)

We’ve seen a great many catastrophes in the history of life, and been reminded of the role of sheer chance in evolution. But the Cenozoic also sees a dramatic adaptive radiation and the steady progress of arms races among survivors of the great dinosaur die-off. Four large scale groupings of placental mammals have already appeared: Afrotheres (aardvarks, hyraxes, elephants, and sea cows), Xenarthrans (anteaters, armadillos, and sloths), Laurasiatheres (shrews, hedgehogs, pangolins, bats, whales, hoofed animals, and carnivores), and Supraprimates (aka Euarchontoglires, including rodents, tree shrews, and primates). This grouping of mammals is anything but obvious – it’s only with DNA sequencing that it has emerged. What’s noticeable is the association with different continents: Afrotheres with Africa, Xenarthrans with South America, and the others with the monster content of Laurasia (Eurasia and North America). Looking beyond placental mammals we see other continental associations: marsupials flourish in South America and Australia, and giant flightless “terror birds” carry on rather like predatory dinosaurs in South America.

There is a pattern here. Evolutionary arms races are most intense in the supercontinent of Laurasia (eventually joined by India and Africa). The island continents of South America and Australia stand apart, and they fare poorly when they start exchanging fauna with the rest of the world. We’ll see a similar pattern – large areas stimulate more competition, and more intense evolution, isolated areas are at a disadvantage – when we start looking at human history. (This is a major theme of Diamond’s deservedly popular Guns, Germs, and Steel.)

A bear there was, a bear, a bear

The end-Cretaceous mass extinction knocked off not only the dinosaurs (except for birds), but also air-breathing marine predators like mososaurs and plesiosaurs. Birds and mammals started moving into the empty niche: penguins from early on, and eventually whales.
penguins

(Cartoon by Sam Gross. Not scientifically accurate.)

The whale story is particularly dramatic. When Darwin was tried to account for the evolution of whales from a land-dwelling ancestor, he cited accounts of bears swimming and feeding in water, and wrote “I can see no difficulty in a race of bears being rendered, by natural selection, more and more aquatic in their structure and habits, with larger and larger mouths, till a creature was produced as monstrous as a whale.” This statement attracted so much ridicule that Darwin took it out of later editions of the Orgin of Species. But he turns out to have been very much on target. We now have a great sequence of whale ancestors. The sequence runs from yesterday’s Pakicetus — a wolf size meat-and-fish eater that splashed along the shores of the ancient Tethys sea separating Africa from Eurasia — to today’s “walking whale,” Ambulocetus, and on to true whales. Darwin was sort of on the right track thinking of bears, but anatomy and genetics put the ancestors of whales firmly among artiodactyls – hooved animals including hippos, pigs, and cows.

Strange relations and island continents

We’ve now reached the Cenozoic era – our era. The transition from Paleocene to Eocene epochs in the early Cenozoic (55 million years ago) saw a spike in CO2 levels and a sharp rise in temperatures that lasted for several hundred thousand years – perhaps an analog for human-caused global warming in our own time.

We’ve seen a great many catastrophes in the history of life, and been reminded of the role of sheer chance in evolution. But the Cenozoic also sees a dramatic adaptive radiation and the steady progress of arms races among survivors of the great dinosaur die-off. Four large scale groupings of placental mammals have already appeared: Afrotheres (aardvarks, hyraxes, elephants, and sea cows), Xenarthrans (anteaters, armadillos, and sloths), Laurasiatheres (shrews, hedgehogs, pangolins, bats, whales, hoofed animals, and carnivores), and Supraprimates (aka Euarchontoglires, including rodents, tree shrews, and primates). This grouping of mammals is anything but obvious – it’s only with DNA sequencing that it has emerged. What’s noticeable is the association with different continents: Afrotheres with Africa, Xenarthrans with South America, and the others with the monster content of Laurasia (Eurasia and North America). Looking beyond placental mammals we see other continental associations: marsupials flourish in South America and Australia, and giant flightless “terror birds” carry on rather like predatory dinosaurs in South America.

There is a pattern here. Evolutionary arms races are most intense in the supercontinent of Laurasia (eventually joined by India and Africa). The island continents of South America and Australia stand apart, and they fare poorly when they start exchanging fauna with the rest of the world. We’ll see a similar pattern – large areas stimulate more competition, and more intense evolution, isolated areas are at a disadvantage – when we start looking at human history. (This is a major theme of Diamond’s deservedly popular Guns, Germs, and Steel.)